Federalist Essay

Federalist Essay-80
Because Mc Lean changed the numbers of some of the essays, later editors have questioned whether there were 84 or 85 essays.This is understandable, for there were only 84 essays printed in the newspapers, the essays 32 and 33 by Mc Lean having appeared in the press as a single essay.

Because Mc Lean changed the numbers of some of the essays, later editors have questioned whether there were 84 or 85 essays.This is understandable, for there were only 84 essays printed in the newspapers, the essays 32 and 33 by Mc Lean having appeared in the press as a single essay.

To continue the proposed plan of publication—a plan which occasionally was altered by publishing three instead of four essays a week—the third “Publius” essay of the next week appeared on Friday in .

This pattern of publication was followed through the publication of essay 76 (or essay 77, in the numbering used in this edition of Hamilton’s works) on April 2, 1788.

In essays 78–85 all the changes which appeared in the Hopkins edition are noted.

The edition in which a revision was made is indicated by a short title, either by the name “Mc Lean” or “Hopkins.” To this rule there are, however, three exceptions: 1.

Because of changes made in the Mc Lean edition, the numbering of certain essays presents an editorial problem.

When Mc Lean, with Hamilton’s assistance, published the first edition of , it was decided that the essay published in the newspaper as 35 should follow essay 28, presumably because the subject matter of 35 was a continuation of the subject treated in 28.The essays written by John Jay and James Madison, however, have not been included.They are available in many editions, and they do not, after all, properly belong in the writings of Alexander Hamilton.Both the reasons for his decision and the date on which he conceived the project are conjecturable.Having gone to Albany early in October to attend the fall session of the Supreme Court, he was not in New York City during the early weeks of the controversy over the Constitution.3 He must, nevertheless, have concluded that if it were to be adopted, convincing proof of its merits would have to be placed before the citizens of New York., addressed to the “People of the State of New-York,” was occasioned by the objections of many New Yorkers to the Constitution which had been proposed on September 17, 1787, by the Philadelphia Convention.During the last week in September and the first weeks of October, 1787, the pages of New York newspapers were filled with articles denouncing the Constitution.1 The proposed government also had its defenders, but their articles were characterized by somewhat indignant attacks on those who dared oppose the Constitution rather than by reasoned explanations of the advantages of its provisions.2 The decision to publish a series of essays defending the Constitution and explaining in detail its provisions was made by Alexander Hamilton.All changes which Hamilton later made or approved in the texts of the essays he wrote have been indicated in notes.Thus in essays 1–77 all changes made in the Mc Lean and Hopkins editions in Hamilton’s essays are given.When an obvious typographical error appears in the text taken from the newspaper, it has been corrected without annotation. When in Mc Lean there is a correction of a printer’s error which, if left unchanged, would make the text meaningless or inaccurate, that correction has been incorporated in the text; the word or words in the newspaper for which changes have been substituted are then indicated in the notes. Obvious printer’s errors in punctuation have been corrected; a period at the end of a question, for example, has been changed to a question mark.When a dash is used at the end of a sentence, a period has been substituted.

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