Good Comparison Essays

Good Comparison Essays-48
Example: “The historical evidence appears to suggest a clear-cut situation.On the other hand, the archaeological evidence presents a somewhat less straightforward picture of what happened that day.” Usage: Used in a similar manner to “on the other hand” or “but”.It’s by no means an exhaustive list, and there will often be other ways of using the words and phrases we describe that we won’t have room to include, but there should be more than enough below to help you make an instant improvement to your essay-writing skills.

Similarly, we have a tendency to react with surprise to the unfamiliar.” Usage: Use the phrase “another key point to remember” or “another key fact to remember” to introduce additional facts without using the word “also”.

Example: “As a Romantic, Blake was a proponent of a closer relationship between humans and nature.

For you to have a clue on what exactly are they, here is a list of the most common contrast and compare transition words and phrases that are used in everyday writing and speech. Contrast 3: I want to buy an ice cream; unfortunately, my mother does not want me to buy one. Comparison 3: I eat ice cream slowly; similarly, I eat cotton candies slowly, too.

Contrast 1: I want to buy an ice cream, but my mother does not want me to buy one. Comparison 1: I eat ice cream slowly, in the same way I eat cotton candies. The examples above demonstrate how to use both type of transition words.

Example: “Not only did Edmund Hillary have the honour of being the first to reach the summit of Everest, but he was also appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire.” Usage: Used when considering two or more arguments at a time. Usage: “Not to mention” and “to say nothing of” can be used to add extra information with a bit of emphasis.

Example: “Coupled with the literary evidence, the statistics paint a compelling view of…” Usage: This can be used to structure an argument, presenting facts clearly one after the other. Example: “The war caused unprecedented suffering to millions of people, not to mention its impact on the country’s economy.” When you’re developing an argument, you will often need to present contrasting or opposing opinions or evidence – “it could show this, but it could also show this”, or “X says this, but Y disagrees”.

Example: “Moreover, the results of a recent piece of research provide compelling evidence in support of…” Usage: This is also generally used at the start of a sentence, to add extra information.

Example: “Furthermore, there is evidence to suggest that…” Usage: This is used in the same way as “moreover” and “furthermore”.

Usage: “In order to” can be used to introduce an explanation for the purpose of an argument.

Example: “In order to understand X, we need first to understand Y.” Usage: Use “in other words” when you want to express something in a different way (more simply), to make it easier to understand, or to emphasise or expand on a point. In other words, they live on the land and in the water.” Usage: This phrase is another way of saying “in other words”, and can be used in particularly complex points, when you feel that an alternative way of wording a problem may help the reader achieve a better understanding of its significance. To put it another way, they will die without the sun.” Usage: “That is” and “that is to say” can be used to add further detail to your explanation, or to be more precise. That is to say, they must breathe air.” Usage: Use “to that end” or “to this end” in a similar way to “in order to” or “so”.

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