Literature Reviews Samples

Literature Reviews Samples-25
Each has unique requirements concerning the sections that must be included in the paper.A literature review is a critical summary of what the scientific literature says about your specific topic or question.

Each has unique requirements concerning the sections that must be included in the paper.A literature review is a critical summary of what the scientific literature says about your specific topic or question.

An example of a literature review on language and gender with annotated comments. review from the social sciences See the following link. "Theory and Evidence on the Political Economy of Minimum Wage." Journal of Political Economy 107 (August 1999): 761-85. "The Theory of Economic Regulation." Bell Journal of Economics and Management Science 2 (Spring 1971): 3-21.

In the last few years, prompted largely by the work of Card and Kruger (1995), numerous articles on the employment effects of minimum wage legislation have appeared.

As with the literature review, the length of this report may vary by course or by journal, but most often it will be determined by the scope of the research conducted.

If you are writing a paper that fits neither of these categories, follow the guidelines about General Format, consult your instructor, or look up advice in the .

NOTE: A literature review and an annotated bibliography are not synonymous.

If you are asked to write an annotated bibliography, you should consult the for the APA Format for Annotated Bibliographies.An example of a student literature review in psychology and lecturer's comments is here.A literature review in a proposal to investigate how indigenous peoples choose plant medicines.To anticipate future problems, Seltzer emphasized that not only are some variables inevitably theoretically ambiguous (a low-wage worker may rationally support or oppose minimum wage increases depending on whether job loss is expected), but also the coefficients on some variables must be interpreted cautiously. For example, should the coefficient for a variable measuring teen workers in the labor force be interpreted as their demand for higher wages, or does the coefficient better reflect the demands of well-organized firms that disproportionally hire younger workers? S., Canada presents a better opportunity to study variations in minimum wages across jurisdictions and time, so it is perhaps surprising that the only study, to our knowledge, that examines Canadian minimum wage determination is Blais et al. They related the minimum wage, measured as the minimum wage divided by the average manufacturing wage, to the percentages of union workers, women, and 15 to 19-year-olds in the labor force, the current year unemployment rate, the inflation rate, the percentage of employment in small firms (less than 20 employees), and a "convergence" variable that measures average manufacturing wages in a province divided by average wages in Canada. "Capture and Ideology in the Economic Theory of Politics." American Economic Review 74 (June 1984): 279-300. If certain information is particularly pertinent for conveying your research, then ensure that there is a section of your paper that adequately addresses that information.Example of a short literature review in sports medicine is available here.More recently, Seltzer (1995) explored support in both the House and Senate for the 1938 introduction of the federal minimum wage law. He found variables representing small business and low-wage workers decreased support for the bill, while ideology (liberals for, conservatives against) was also important. "Voting on Minimum Wages: A Time-Series Analysis." Journal of Political Economy 86 (April 1978): 337-42. This renewed interest in how minimum wages affect employment leads naturally to another question: What factors determine the minimum wage? the minimum wage is legislated at the federal rather than at the state level of government. Despite the ubiquity of minimum wage legislation, this question has received surprisingly little attention. Since this federal wage changes only occasionally, most U. studies have been limited to cross-sectional studies that focus on how the characteristics of the states, and the party affiliation of legislators, influence the vote on proposed changes in the federal minimum wage (Silberman and Durbin, 1970; Kau and Rubin, 1978; Bloch, 1980; Seltzer, 1995).[1] However, as pointed out by Baker et al. studies have usually been cross sectional and have examined what variables influenced congressional voting for increases in the federal minimum wage.[3] For example, Bloch (1993) related state wage levels and proportions of unionized employees to votes by senators to amend the 19 Federal Labor Standards Act and thereby increase the minimum wage.

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