Prohibition Essay Introduction

Indeed, entire illegal economies (bootlegging, speakeasies, and distilling operations) flourished.The earliest bootleggers began smuggling foreign-made commercial liquor into the United States from across the Canadian and Mexican borders and along the seacoasts from ships under foreign registry. That type of smuggling became riskier and more expensive when the U. Coast Guard began halting and searching ships at greater distances from the coast and using fast motor launches of its own.As a result, the Prohibition Unit was founded within the IRS.

The Eighteenth Amendment was ratified in the hopes of eliminating alcohol from American life. To the contrary, people intent on drinking found loopholes in the newly passed anti-liquor laws that allowed them to slake their thirst, and, when that didn’t work, they turned to illegal avenues to do so.

An entire black market—comprising bootleggers, speakeasies, and distilling operations—emerged as a result of Prohibition, as did organized crime syndicates which coordinated the complex chain of operations involved in the manufacture and distribution of alcohol.

The nationwide moratorium on alcohol would stay in place for the next 13 years, at which point a general disenchantment with the policy—affected by factors ranging from the rise of organized crime to the economic malaise brought on by the stock market crash of 1929—led to its disbandment at the federal level by the Twenty-first Amendment.

The prohibition of alcohol continued to exist at the state level in some places for the next two decades, as it had for over a half-century prior to the ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment in 1919.

The temperance movement advocated for moderation in—and in its most extreme form, complete abstinence from the consumption of—alcohol (although actual Prohibition only banned the manufacture, transportation, and trade of alcohol, rather than its consumption).

The temperance movement began amassing a following in the 1820s and ’30s, bolstered by the religious revivalism that was sweeping the nation at that time.As a result, the Prohibition era also is remembered as a period of gangsterism, characterized by competition and violent turf battles between criminal gangs.Nationwide Prohibition came about as a result of the temperance movement.Nationwide Prohibition lasted from 1920 until 1933. In 1919 the amendment was ratified by the three-quarters of the nation’s states required to make it constitutional.The Eighteenth Amendment—which illegalized the manufacture, transportation, and sale of alcohol—was passed by the U. That same year the Volstead Act, which engineered the means by which the U. government would enforce Prohibition, was passed as well.It was Ness and his team of Untouchables—Prohibition agents whose name derived from the fact that they were “untouchable” to bribery—that toppled Chicago’s bootlegger kingpin Al Capone by exposing his tax evasion.In the United States an early wave of movements for state and local prohibition arose from the intensive religious revivalism of the 1820s and ’30s, which stimulated movements toward perfectionism in human beings, including temperance and abolitionism.Corruption in law enforcement became widespread as criminal organizations used bribery to keep officials in their pockets.Prohibition was detrimental to the economy as well, by eliminating jobs supplied by what had formerly been the fifth largest industry in America.By the end of the 1920s, Prohibition had lost its luster for many who had formerly been the policy’s most ardent supporters, and it was done away with by the Twenty-first Amendment in 1933.From Prohibition’s inception, people found ways to keep drinking.

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